3 Admit to Assaulting a Federal Cop on the Crow Indian Reservation

Two men and a woman have confessed to assaulting a federal lawman on the Crow Indian Reservation in 2021 and are awaiting sentencing.

On Wednesday, September 14, in Billings, Montana, Darnell Lee Not Afraid, 38, pleaded guilty to possession of a firearm during the attack on the Bureau of Indian Affairs police officer, which occurred in the hamlet of Lodge Grass following a high-speed pursuit of the Prior’s man, who had stolen a lorry.

Not Afraid’s 25-year-old girlfriend, Darwyna Caylynn Catherine Bull Shows, pleaded guilty on July 12 to slapping the officer three times during the March 14, 2021 incident.

And on Thursday Earl Landon Old Chief Jr., 36, pleaded guilty to joining a mob that attacked the officer and prevented him from arresting Not Afraid and Bull Shows, who fled to the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation.

Federal agents from the Bureau of Indian Affairs tackle a Montana blizzard sweeping through the Crow Indian Reservation December 11, 2013. BIA law enforcement agents operate in more than 200 Indian communities nationwide national. Photo by Bureau of Indian Affairs.

On March 27, 2021, Tribal Police arrested the two fugitives following another vehicle chase that ended with Not Afraid brandishing a gun.

The 2021 incident began when police began chasing Not Afraid and Bull Shows, a chase that would last 25 minutes as the stolen truck drove through residential neighborhoods, nearly hitting several pedestrians.

At some point during the chase, Not Afraid slowed down and let his girlfriend out before he sped up.

Not Afraid finally braked at Lodge Grass – called Eelalapio in Crow – and jumped out of his truck to flee on foot, with a federal officer hot on his heels.

The officer – identified only by the surname “Wichita” in court documents – pulled out his Taser stun gun. Not Afraid turned, pulled up his shirt, and pulled a silver gun from his belt.

Crow Indian Reservation

On January 25, 2013, federal agents from the Bureau of Indian Affairs Bureau of Justice Services and Crow Police visited Lodge Grass K-12 School, located on the Crow Indian Reservation. Photo by Bureau of Indian Affairs.

The officer dropped his Taser, quickly drew his service pistol and fired several rounds at Not Afraid, waving his arm.

Wichita secured the revolver, which was loaded with seven rounds, but a gathered crowd never saw this.

They believed he shot Not Afraid in cold blood. This is why some members of the mob prevented him from arresting Not Afraid while others helped the truck thief escape.

And that’s when Old Chief entered the fray, according to court records. He charged at Wichita, threw a glass bottle at him, then snatched the Taser from the ground officer.

Wichita never cocked the Taser, so when the stun gun’s camera captured Old Chief aiming a red laser dot at the officer’s face, he knew the Lodge Grass man must have activated it.

And that’s where Wichita got lucky. The old chief threw the Taser at him instead of firing him.

Crow Indian Reservation

In the heart of the Crow Tribe homeland, the Crow Indian Reservation was founded in 1868 and spans parts of Big Horn, Treasure and Yellowstone counties in Montana. About 8,000 people live on the reservation, and one in five people continue to use Crow as their first language. Photo by Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Per Bull Shows’ plea deal, she also arrived alongside the mob and slapped Wichita before escaping with her boyfriend.

She is expected to be sentenced Dec. 7 by U.S. District Judge Susan P. Watters.

Not Afraid later confessed that he healed his gunshot wound by cauterizing it.

He was previously convicted in Fort Belknap Tribal Court on 11 counts, including attempted assault on a peace officer, resisting arrest and drug offenses.

He was sentenced to one year behind bars for these charges. He later told authorities that he intended to throw away his revolver and that he never considered shooting a federal officer on either reservation.

Crow Indian Reservation

In the heart of the Crow Tribe homeland, the Crow Indian Reservation was founded in 1868 and spans parts of Big Horn, Treasure and Yellowstone counties in Montana. About 8,000 people live on the reservation, and one in five people continue to use Crow as their first language. Photo by Bureau of Indian Affairs.

The plea agreement Not Afraid signed with federal prosecutors for the Lodge Grass fracas limits his prison term to five years, the mandatory minimum sentence.

Unlike Not Afraid and Bull Shows, Old Chief pleaded guilty without signing an agreement, a decision that preserves his right to appeal his conviction and sentence.

Attempts by Coffee or Die Magazine to reach the three defendants were unsuccessful. Not Afraid and Old Chief remain incarcerated, pending their sentencing hearings. And Bull Shows does not have a phone number or email address listed.

Their lawyers also did not respond to coffee or dieit is messages seeking comments.

Read more : Ohio man who kept impersonating cops was going to jail


Nohemi M. Moore