US Army to conduct fifth Native American exhumation at Carlisle Barracks

A fifth effort to exhume the remains of Native American children who died more than 100 years ago at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School begins this weekend in Cumberland County. Beginning Saturday, the remains of eight more students will be exhumed from Carlisle Barracks and returned to their loved ones. “The return of their children provides these families with the opportunity to move forward with the process of closure and healing,” said Army National Cemeteries Executive Director Karen Durham-Aguilera. The Carlisle Indian Industrial School opened in 1879 and housed some 10,000 Native children before it closed in 1918. Historians say the site was used to forcibly assimilate children into American society. The remains of other students have been exhumed in recent years. WGAL has documented the historic process in our special feature Chronicle: Bring Them Home. You can watch it here.

A fifth effort to exhume the remains of Native American children who died more than 100 years ago at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School begins this weekend in Cumberland County.

From Saturday, the remains of eight other students will be exhumed from Carlisle Barracks and returned to their loved ones.

“Returning their children provides these families with the opportunity to move forward with the process of closure and healing,” said Army National Cemeteries Executive Director Karen Durham-Aguilera.

The Carlisle Indian Industrial School opened in 1879 and housed some 10,000 Aboriginal children before it closed in 1918.

Historians say the site was used to forcibly assimilate children into American society.

The remains of other students have been exhumed in recent years. WGAL has documented the historic process in our special feature Chronicle: Bring Them Home. You can watch it here.

Nohemi M. Moore